Permeable Hardscaping – Two Projects

Permeable Hardscaping is the third in our series of DIY landscaping videos. The video features two projects – a permeable patio using natural stone, and a Drivable Grass walkway.

(More information on Drivable Grass here: https://www.supersod.com/products/drivable-grass.html )

The trend in new home building seems to be to fit the largest home possible on the smallest lot. When a homeowner tries to add a patio or walkway, they find they cannot because they would exceed their impervious surface limitations.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impervious_surface

One way to add hard surfaces without adding square footage to your impervious surface is through permeable hardscaping. You can even remove a concrete walkway or driveway and replace it with Drivable Grass for a net positive effect on your property’s permeability. Daniel Medina is the talented stone mason featured in this video, filmed at Super-Sod of Cary.

(More information on Super-Sod of Cary here: http://www.supersod.com/cary )

(Press release here http://www.prweb.com/releases/online-garden-courses/super-sod/prweb13934393.htm )

Enjoy the video, and please let me know if you have questions.

For more information about our videographer, Charles Register, click here: http://charlesregister.com/

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Building Stone Walls – 3 Techniques

I am so grateful to work for Super-Sod, a company that encourages creativity and continuing education. The monthly classes offered here on Saturdays throughout the growing season are now available on YouTube. I hope you find them helpful. The class on building stone walls demonstrates 3 techniques: dry-stack, mortared, and natural stone veneer. I’d like to give a shout-out to my friend Daniel Medina, the stone mason featured in this video. I do the talking, but the talent is all his.

For more information about our videographer, Charles Register, click here: http://charlesregister.com/

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Bee Better Garden Tour 2016

Nothing inspires you to whip your garden into shape like committing to a garden tour. Suddenly you have a hard and fast deadline. And then there is the pressure of dozens of people with high expectations coming to tour the garden and…gasp…critique it! I commit to a tour about every 10 years or so. So my garden looks (almost) perfect every 10 years.

This year I signed on to the Bee Better Garden Tour. Bee Better is a great local non-profit dedicated to educating homeowners on the critical importance of pollinators. http://www.beebetter.info  I kept bees for about 3 years, but the bees were better off with another beekeeper. This is not a hobby for someone who works 6 days a week. However, I learned quite a bit about what to do, and what not to do, and beekeeping strengthened my commitment to gardening organically.

Years ago, when I was young and my back was strong, my husband and I would have done all the work ourselves. This time around, I hired two dear friends (and excellent gardeners) to help me with the heavy work – removing overgrown and crowded shrubs, pruning the ones that had “high aspirations”, and hauling away the debris. The detail work I did myself. My husband was a huge help as always. The day was a great success! So much so that I am inspired to commit to another garden tour…in about another ten years.