Mr. Feathers Joins the Team at Super-Sod of Cary

Peacock 4

Mr. Feathers likes Soil3 compost!

A new team member has joined the crew at Super-Sod. Meet Mr. Feathers! He showed up last week and has made himself right at home – bedding down in the wheat straw, wandering through the store, and hanging out by Daniel’s pretty red Mustang. Zenith the cat, our Feral Farm Friend, must have passed the word that Super-Sod of Cary is an animal-friendly place, because when I went out to feed Zenith this morning, Mr. Feathers was hanging out by the back door looking for his breakfast too! It turns out that peacocks think cat food is a treat! Today I plan to pick him up some food more appropriate for his kind.

Peacock 3

After Breakfast, he even made a pass through the store. We have had lots of animal visitors in the past – Maggie the dog is a regular, as is Axel the Golden Retriever. We have had turtles and frogs come into the store, but Mr. Feathers is the most interesting so far! He’s still a bit shy, but he is getting used to the hustle and bustle around here.

 

Feral Cat “Zenith” Joins the Crew at Super-Sod

Cat 2

Everyone loves a friendly kitten. They are cute, fun, energetic, bouncy, cuddly…did I mention cute? And friendly adult cats are almost as adoptable as kittens. But the overlooked cats in shelters all over the country are the feral cats brought in by animal control officers. Feral cats are different from strays. Strays are domestic cats who have been lost or abandoned, but who still want to interact with humans. Feral cats were usually born wild, and have not had much if any positive interaction with humans. They are nearly impossible to place because they are so fearful.  They will likely never cuddle with a human. Giving a feral cat a second chance is not about our needs, it’s about their needs – a purely altruistic gesture.

One solution is TNR (Trap Neuter Return). If you see a feral cat with a notched ear, that is the indication that they have been neutered and vaccinated through one of these programs. But many were taken from locations where they are not welcome to return. So the sad reality is that many feral cats captured by animal control officers are euthanized. But at the Wake County Animal Center in Raleigh, NC, staff have come up with a creative solution – a program they are calling Feral Farm Friends (check out their Facebook page here https://www.facebook.com/Feral-Farm-Friends-1721076118136119/?hc_location=ufi ). They are reaching out to farms, garden centers and storage facilities and encouraging them to adopt feral cats.

And what does this have to do with gardening? Farms, large gardens, and garden centers are great placements for feral cats. They can keep the rodent population down without using poisons (organic pest management), they will have outbuildings for shelter, and their lives are saved! The Super-Sod team in Cary (my workplace) thought this was such a good idea, we have adopted a feral cat for our store through Wake County’s Feral Farm Friends! Daniel is cleaning out the shed and turning it into a cat house with a cat door for access. I’ve set up the transition crate with a warm nest out of a milk crate, cardboard, wheat straw and a blanket, as well as a temporary litter box and food and water dishes. Our cat will stay in the transition crate for several days, getting used to the fact that we are a good food source, before being released to the property. The crate will start out in my office, and then be moved to the shed.

ShedCrate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have named our Feral Farm Friend “Zenith”, after our best-selling Zenith Zoysia, hoping she will be as resilient as this beautiful, adaptable turf grass. www.supersod.com/sod/zoysia-sod/zenith-zoysia-sod.html So far Zenith is very shy and quiet. We are giving her space and time to learn that she can trust us, and that we are her food source. So keep checking back in to Personal Edens to follow the adventures of Zenith. Better yet, come by the store and meet her! If you would like more information on adding a couple Feral Farm Friends from your local shelter to your farm, garden or store, just ask. I’ll help in any way I can.