Visiting Seeds of Durham

The seasonal nature of agriculture allows me to venture out in the slower months and see what others are doing in the community to share their knowledge and encourage a new generation of gardeners. Today I dropped by Seeds of Durham to tour their facility, and I was very excited by the program! 

 “Founded in 1994, SEEDS is a two-acre urban garden and kitchen classroom in the heart of Durham. SEEDS develops the capacity of young people to respect life, the earth, and each other through growing, cooking, and sharing food.”

Garden Manager Trevor Hyde encouraged me to walk through the gardens. It is a very welcoming space with a surprise around every corner. 

Classroom and Kitchen

They have paid respect to the natural topography, adding terraced beds and meandering paths with gentle steps where needed. The outdoor classroom and kitchen/dining space sits at an upper corner with a view of the sloped gardens, the chicken enclosure, and the water feature. It’s a warm, inviting and colorful space. 

Terraced garden beds
Beds of winter greens

Even in December, the gardens were flourishing and the chickens were plump and happy…running over to greet me.

Friendly Chickens!

Seeds is teaching children what can be grown in the city in limited space, how to prepare fresh produce, and how to eat healthy. In the era of the farm-to-table movement, this knowledge will be invaluable as this young generation enters the job market and sets up homes of their own. Perhaps some will be inspired to become chefs, farmers, educators…

I believe that all the children who are fortunate enough to experience this program will take away an appreciation for the garden and for healthy living. If you are looking for a good non-profit to support, I strongly encourage you to consider Seeds of Durham.

Bee Downtown keeps the Triangle Buzzing

We cannot survive without bees. No bees, no food. We ignore this relationship at our own peril. Central North Carolina has a couple of hive-minded organizations that recognize the urgency of maintaining a healthy bee population – Bee Better and Bee Downtown. I have volunteered for events sponsored by both organizations, and I highly recommend them both.

In December, I spent an afternoon at the Interfaith Food Shuttle’s Geer Street Learning Garden, planting fruit trees, herbs and perennials that attract pollinators. The Geer Street Learning Garden is part of the Interfaith Food Shuttle’s effort to bring fresh vegetables, and the knowledge of how to grow them to a neighborhood that was once a food desert. The garden helps feed the hungry and educate the community, especially children, so that they can grow their own fruits and vegetables. The Durham Agricultural Manager for IFFS,  Eliza Bordley, brings creativity to the endeavor – incorporating hugelkultur, a pizza garden and a soup garden. This planting day was a joint effort between IFFS and Bee Downtown.

bee-downtown-2

“Bee Downtown installs and maintains sustainable bee communities for businesses in urban areas. Starting with one of the Nation’s fastest growing regions, the Triangle, our beekeepers work to repopulate the environment with healthy hives while providing partnering companies a one-of-a-kind green marketing opportunity.” http://www.beedowntown.org

Bee Downtown has installed hives all over the Triangle, with their most visible hive at Burt’s Bees World Headquarters at the American Tobacco Campus in Durham. They have placed hives at Bull Durham Beer Company, Capitol Broadcasting Company, and Durham Public Schools’ Hub Farm, to name a few.

What makes an organization successful? Its people. While volunteering, I met Leigh-Kathryn Bonner, the founder and CEO of Bee Downtown, and Justin Maness, their lead beekeeper. Both impressed me with their knowledge, commitment, warmth and enthusiasm.

bee-downtown-1

Super-Sod of Cary donated a BigYellowBag (one cubic yard) of OMRI listed Soil3 compost to the Geer Street Learning Garden. Personally, I welcomed the opportunity to get my hands dirty helping two local organizations do a good thing for the community. If your hands are itching to dig in the dirt and help your local community, contact one of these local organizations.

Vegetable Gardening in NC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8JhO_wN9_Y

I have been teaching a series of classes at Super-Sod in Cary this year, and we now have a video of my first class, Vegetable Gardening in NC. I hope you find it helpful. We have had great success gardening in pure Soil3 organic compost. We have a bumper crop of heirloom tomatoes this year, as well as eggplant, cucumbers, peppers and herbs! Be sure to watch the section on building a potato tower!

 

 

Nothing Tastes Better Than Home Grown

           Collards 1 Collards 2 Collards 3

Edible Landscaping is near and dear to my heart because I love to garden, and I love to eat fresh fruits and vegetables – who doesn’t? This year I got a very late start on my Winter vegetable planting. But here in NC,nature provided an unexpected warm-up in December, and 8″ of rain, resulting in a bumper crop of greens. It helps that they were planted in pure Soil3 from Super-Sod. Soil3 is my favorite compost http://www.soil3.com and I use it in my vegetable gardens, as a top-dressing for all my perennial gardens, and on my Emerald Zoysia lawn. As a disclaimer, I work for Super-Sod, but if I lost my job tomorrow, I would still use this compost.

Yesterday afternoon, I headed out to the raised vegetable beds and cut Cabbage Collards and Curly Kale. I added them to some organic bok choi, onions, homemade ham stock, bacon fat (yum), turmeric, salt and pepper. This mix simmered for about an hour and a half. I served the greens with back beans and a perfectly cooked steak (thanks to Gary the Grill Master). If you grow your own food, you know it always tastes better because it doesn’t get any fresher than picked that day; and the personal satisfaction of saying “I grew that” is pretty tasty too!

What grows in your Winter Garden? If you don’t have one, start one in your Personal Eden! Need advice? Just ask! I will be offering a Vegetable Gardening class in March so stay tuned…